agile

agile, CIO, Lean, Lean PMO, Lean Startup, Philosophy, Purpose, Stability, Strategy

Why purpose driven businesses attract more criticism


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A natural consequence of getting older is the realisation that backing the “right moral cause” doesn’t necessarily win friends and influence people. In fact, sometimes it can do quite the opposite.

Disrupting things for the “common good” can even put a price on your head.  

If a man of the stature of Martin Luther King can have liberal opponents at the height of the civil rights movement, then you can bet your life that whatever purpose you stand for, the criticism with come from every which way. What’s more, it will come from friends and enemies alike.

From Tesla to Gillette and from Cadbury to Laura Ashley, companies have lost the moral high ground for a number of different reasons. PR mistakes, powerful competitors, or just a misplaced purpose that doesn’t resonate with the brand’s customers. Purpose is a fine line to tread and the sands can easily shift.

Tesla’s founder Elon Musk was already facing a storm from powerful players invested in the status quo when he famously fell from grace with the “Pedo tweet”. Gillette recently created an advert that left a huge backlash while Cadbury never quite regained its wholesome quaker, high quality, worker championing reputation after the Kraft takeover. Laura Ashley meanwhile, never moved it’s wifely image with the feminist times and got left behind in the process. https://hbr.org/1999/07/why-good-companies-go-bad

Don’t we just love to bring down the self-proclaimed hero or heroine? What is it about human nature that draws us to do this? Is it just good old Schadenfreude that makes us joyful at the fallen? Is it just that it’s a bigger story to bring down the god fearing priest rather than the self-proclaimed Lothario? Or is there something deeper going on?

As humans we often seem to search for an easy, cartoon style dichotomy and we struggle with nuanced characters. These days working out the baddies from the goodies is actually harder than ever. https://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/what_makes_a_hero. Philip Zimbardo, the world-renowned psychologist (perhaps best known for his infamous Stanford Prison Experiment) says, “[A]..key insight from my research has been that there’s no clear line between good and evil. Instead, the line is permeable; people can cross back and forth between it.” 

And boy, are we sucked into the news story when they do!

Meanwhile, in today’s media jet-washed, squeaky clean world we are lacking the main quality of leadership – authenticity.

Unfortunately, these days our leaders are incentivised to be less authentic in order to avoid the media backlash should they say something “wrong” or be caught “dancing to the wrong tune..” as Teresa May was said to have done. This makes purpose driven entrepreneurs (and politicians for that matter) arguably more courageous than ever before if they step outside of societal norms to give an opinion that swims against the tide. Reputation damage is the new death blow. At the same time, the Gillette advert and other similar contentious campaigns, have perhaps left the consumer more distrustful of the purpose-led narrative overall.

So is this all just rather depressing or is there a light at the end of the tunnel?

Well maybe there is. The existence of this opposition may actually be doing purpose-driven entrepreneurs some good! Take Gareth Southgate’s England experiences as an example from Sport. On the one hand he was once the most jeered at man in football. Today? – Today he is the hero and an archetypal leader. This is apparently known as “Adversarial Growth” (http://wrap.warwick.ac.uk/3626/)

“A number of studies have shown that extremely negative, stressful experiences  actually lead to  positive psychological outcomes. ..positive cognitive abilities like efficiency of cognitive processing, problem solving and acceptance, optimism etc can all be enhanced by experiencing and dealing effectively with negative, stressful experiences.” (https://www.theguardian.com/science/brain-flapping/2018/jul/06/zero-to-hero-the-psychological-benefits-of-gareth-southgates-experience)

Furthermore, the people with the most critics are often the ones with the most passionate and vocal advocates too. Take Elon Musk as a good example. His car doesn’t even need advertising https://adage.com/article/cmo-strategy/tesla-paid-advertising/310008/. Why is that? Because Tesla have created a sales force bigger than any other – its customers.

As businesses looking for our voice, we should therefore

embrace authenticity and purpose and go out into the unknown with courage.

This is what leading people do and from the statistics it appears that this is what leading companies do. “According to New York Times bestselling author Simon Mainwaring, 91% of consumers would switch brands if a different one was purpose-driven and had similar price and quality.” https://www.forbes.com/sites/hayleyleibson/2018/01/25/the-power-of-purpose-driven/#a213d9c5dca6

So as we reflect on the nature of purpose (and indeed it’s worth) we should perhaps accept that we may not convince everyone of our brand’s wider virtues. Indeed we may attract opposition and even downright animosity towards our organisations. However, if we stick to the truth of who we are, our values and what our companies were built to do. Then, I am willing to wager we will fly rather than falter. And.. if we don’t fly as far as we’d hoped? Well, knowledge and friends are certainly a good launchpad in the new disrupted economy.

Stephanie Chamberlain is CEO & Founder of Magic Milestones a company that helps large organisations keep their product roadmaps agile yet in line with their strategy & purpose. www.magicmilestones.com 

agile, Investment Management, Leadership, Lean PMO, Product Management, Project Management, Project Office, Scrum, Stakeholder Management, Teams

SAFE: The good, the bad and the ugly


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Why Scaled Agile Framework? SAFe® 4.5*

There are lots of things that recommend SAFe to any organisation looking to Scale agile.

  1. It has some pretty comprehensive open source documentation that helps you work out how to implement it https://www.theknowledgeacademy.com/courses/agile-training/certified-scaled-agile-framework-leading-safe-4-5-training-and-exam/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIzvSO_47n2QIV5r3tCh0dGQLLEAAYASAAEgLHo_D_BwE
  2. For organisations where a framework needs to look ‘meaty’ in order to have any weight.  SAFe sure has the look of a meaty method.  There are lots of new words to learn, lots of additional organisational structural changes to be made and it looks and smells like a worthwhile endeavour just because of the sheer time investment needed to understand it.
  3. The Program Increment Planning session is a pretty good tool for any scaled agile team.  It takes a lot of people and it aligns them behind one plan.
  4. When an organisation is used to governance, and quite heavy governance at that, there are items such as the Portfolio layer of SAFe 4.5 that give these organisations some comfort in how to mesh the agile ways of working with the current governance of the organisation.  It doesn’t look too big a jump.  As such, it isn’t a bad middle ground if something like LeSS seems too big a jump.
  5. In terms of the layers needed to scale up SCRUM https://www.scrumalliance.org/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIhoKYs5Dn2QIVTb7tCh3zkQU2EAAYASAAEgIIrPD_BwE  SAFe does truly look at each layer according to the usual project management requirements.  You have the team, project, programme and portfolio layer easily mappable (especially in SAFe 4.5).

So what’s NOT to like…

  1. The documentation while extensive is cleverly written so that only people who can really decipher it are those that have attended the course or who have direct experience of it.  If you are looking to implement SAFe with just this information at your fingertip, beware!  It won’t get you there like the Scrum Guide will.
  2. Just because a method looks meaty doesn’t mean it’s going to work.  Given how hard straight SCRUM is to get people to get behind, a whole new framework is even harder.  It is made harder by the SAFe folk insisting on using Scrum terms such as “Epic” in entirely new ways.
  3. Although the Program Increment Planning session is good.  It isn’t just one ceremony.  Early PIPs need preparation and the guides don’t tell you this.  The first PIP isn’t as easy as the PIP agenda suggests it might be.  As such a few ‘dry runs’ might be required before you attempt the big one!
  4. Although SAFe is fairly comprehensive, the biggest area in which it lets the practitioner down is in the proposed structure of the team.  The roles in SAFe just don’t make a lot of sense.  They are a mesh of an old world meeting a new and the beauty and simplicity of Scrum is lost in the new jargon.  This is further confounded by the assertion that roles such as the Solution Architect can be enacted by more than one individual.  The benefit of Scrum is the clarity of roles and this is lost in the SAFe framework IMHO.
  5. Governance in SAFe is probably the best part area.  It gives the best account of Portfolio level than any other scaled agile method in my opinion.  However, there are still some significant gaps in the ‘how’ of all this.  No doubt these will be ironed out in SAFe version 5.  At Magic Milestones we already have a Lean PMO method that fits nicely into this space and could support SAFe if required but could also support many of the other frameworks too.

Ultimately, organisations should be shuffling off the mortal coil of projects in favour of product structures and processes.  So as an interim between two states SAFe can be a good middle ground.  However, ultimately if you want to get to the punch-line quicker you will choose another method to get there.

*When referring to “SAFe” in this article it is always the trademarked version available to read about here.  https://www.theknowledgeacademy.com/courses/agile-training/certified-scaled-agile-framework-leading-safe-4-5-training-and-exam/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIzvSO_47n2QIV5r3tCh0dGQLLEAAYASAAEgLHo_D_BwE

Magic Milestones is an independent advisor on Scaled Agile methods and is not allied to one method over any another.  We train in all methods in order to choose the best options for our clients.

agile, Consultancy & Training, Lean PMO, Product Management, Scrum, Strategy

Wow! A PMO that are exactly what the world needs right now..


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So we can’t call them out because we are under NDA but wow.

I am currently working with the best PMO I have ever come across.

Forget Magic Milestones.  They don’t need us.  Why?  Because the people that are in the PMO aren’t even “can do” people.  They are “done before you even thought it” people.  So they can learn a little from Lean techniques and methods, yes sure.  But they have something that makes our job way easier and something which catapults a team to huge success.

Enthusiasm

Commitment

Delivery mentality.

I can honestly say that in 10 years I have not found a PMO more awesome than this one.  I guess it helps when the partners we are working with are also pretty awesome too but it is the PMO in particular that has made me wowed out this week.

Here’s to a wild time guys.  It’s going to be a challenge but a blast!

 

agile, Brexit, CIO, Investment Management, Leadership, Lean, Lean PMO, Politics, Stability, Strategy

A Nifty Article Fifty Breakdown


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If you are a UK CIO you have a lot to think about if June 8th takes article 50 to its natural conclusion…

Here is a nifty breakdown from CIO.com..

“The major milestones for CIOs to keep an eye on include the following:

  • U.K. parliamentary review of Great Repeal Bill (Late 2017): This will provide the first opportunity for an initial assessment of legal impacts on managed service agreements and other IT contract documents.
  • Royal assent of Great Repeal Bill (Mid 2018): At this point, any gaps in the legislation should be addressed, enabling IT organizations to confirm legal impacts and initiate contractual change activities.
  • Brexit negotiations wrap up (Fall 2018): This will create clarity the regulatory, operational, audit, and reporting impacts on IT services.
  • U.K. Houses of Parliament, European Council, EU Parliament, and remaining 27-member Parliament vote on deal (Early 2019): This will confirm IT impacts and enable CIOs to begin related IT change programs
  • Transition period begins (March 2019): CIOs can structure timelines for completion of IT projects to address necessary digital transition and transformation requirements.”

http://www.cio.com/article/3189040/it-industry/how-brexit-will-impact-global-cios-and-it-services.html

However, with all these (less face it) rather boring boxes to tick and cross there will be little resource to deal with the ever increasing pace of change within the wider economy.  As such, the threat of Brexit is not just one of legal and commercial wrangling (Although that will certainly feature heavily).  The real issue is going to be that already stretched IT departments are going to be hit with “Regulation, Regulation, Regulation” when they also have to deal with “Innovation, Innovation, Innovation”.

If Brexit goes ahead the latter is likely to be the biggest casualty.

So how can the CIO keep pace with this?

During this period 3 things will be key to the post-article 50 CIO:

  1. A razor sharp focus on investment in the biggest IT return.  Yes Brexit projects will HAVE to happen but others will need to be picked for their direct impact on organisational outcomes.  This might be revenue or reputation, either way it will be high on the agenda.
  2. Use of Agile to ensure that those BAU projects are kept on track.  Agile methods and techniques such as KANBAN will be needed more than ever to keep visibility high.
  3. IT departments will need to become product centric and better at marketing than the marketing department!  No-one will use your internal product let alone your external one if your team can’t break through the noise of Brexit.

Magic Milestones has a number of services specifically designed to give you maximum bang for buck in times like these.  Read more here.. https://magicmilestones.com/services/

agile, Failure, Investment Management, Lean, Project Management, Project Office, Scrum, Strategy, Uncategorized

Why do only 2.5% of companies successfully deliver 100% of their projects?


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PricewaterhouseCoopers reviewed 10,640 projects worldwide and found that only 2.5% of the companies successfully completed 100% of their projects.

Is this because people are incompetent?   It’s a sad look out for man kind if so.  However, the reality is likely more complicated..

  1.  People can’t concentrate on more than one thing at a time http://bit.ly/1etgh4B so as organisations are made up of people, that applies collectively to organisations as well.
  2. The more time we have to do something the less we achieve.  Take Kickstarter projects as just one example http://kck.st/1VjLaSi  Kickstarter changed the maximum length of a campaign from 90 days to 60 days in 2011 after realising that campaigns that ran for the full 90 days were successful only 24% of the time much less successful than shorter campaigns (over 44%).
  3. As humans we naturally radically under or over estimate what we can achieve.  Unlike pigeons(!) we use contextual information which can lead to biased judgments of interval duration, thereby reducing the precision of these estimates.  http://bit.ly/1XDbbKU

This is why at Magic Milestones we work on 3 themes:

  1. Creating a stable focused team Agile Experts
  2. Focusing on ‘the next right thing’ Lean PMO
  3. Creating a delivery culture using Lean Start-Up and Agile techniques.  Using hard data as a basis for predictions and planning we baseline performance then improve an organisation through  Consultancy & Training

Read more about why we do what we do via Our Story